PANASONIC JAGUAR – SEASON MOVES TO MEXICO

Panasonic Jaguar Racing are ready to continue their fight for points in the fifth E-Prix of the 2017/18 ABB FIA Formula E Championship in Mexico City.

The Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez Circuit is 2,500m above sea level placing greater physical exertion on the drivers and provides a new environment to test the key components of the Jaguar I-TYPE 2. Panasonic Jaguar Racing have shown significant improvement this season and hope to follow-up on their double point-scoring finish in the previous round in Santiago.

Last season Mitch Evans took fourth place in a dramatic Mexico City E-Prix – the Jaguar team’s best result of season three. This season at least one driver has consistently finished in the points and the British team have risen to fourth in the team standings. The team are hopeful that they can deliver another points finish at the only permanent racetrack in the series.

Mitch Evans, #20: “Mexico last year was a fantastic moment for the team. It was the first and only race both drivers finished in the points. So far this season we have made huge improvements on our race strategy and the Jaguar I-TYPE 2 has proved it is a fast race car. Santiago was one of my best performances in Formula E to start in last place and finish seventh was amazing. I’m hoping we can build on that in Mexico City and bring home more points.”

Nelson Piquet Jr, #3:In the last four races we’ve been consistently scoring points on a variety of tracks, both traditional street circuits like in Santiago and semi-street like Marrakesh, so we are hoping we will perform just as well on the traditional circuit in Mexico. Our Jaguar racecars have speed and with every race we get closer and closer to the front of the field. We will push again in Mexico and keep learning and improving as we compete for vital championship points.”

Panasonic Jaguar Racing’s continued success on track has run in parallel with the development of the all new Jaguar I-PACE, Jaguar’s first all-electric performance SUV, which will be launched on 1 March while the race team are in Mexico City.

James Barclay, Team Director, Panasonic Jaguar Racing: “The launch of the new Jaguar I-PACE is a very exciting moment for Jaguar Land Rover and a proud time for our race team. Jaguar joined Formula E as the first premium manufacturer to accelerate our learnings and develop innovative technologies faster and more efficiently than ever before. Electric street racing solidifies our Race to Innovate mission, and marks a new chapter in our move towards electrification. Mexico City was our best race in our first season and we look forward to another strong performance from the team.”

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JAGUAR LAND ROVER SELLING 100 SURPLUS COLLECTION VEHICLES

Jaguar Land Rover is to sell off many of the surplus, non-JLR vehicles from its ex-James Hull Collection, at a dedicated Affordable Classics sale by Brightwells at Bicester Heritage on March 21.

All of the 100 vehicles will be offered at no reserve, and the collection includes many special editions and one-offs. If you fancy the idea of an Austin Allegro Vanden Plas, a Rover P6 shooting brake or a solid Morris Minor, then this is the sale for you – but there are also Citröens, a Chevette 2300 HS, a Borgward Isabella Coupé, and even the four-wheel-drive Ferguson Scimitar prototype.

Jaguar Land Rover purchased much of the vehicle assortment back in 2014, from serial classic collector Dr James Hull. Representing every decade since the 1930s, this accumulation of 543 cars was estimated to be worth £100 million (roughly $139.5 million), although JLR refused to disclose how much it paid at the time.

Jaguar Land Rover has cared for the cars ever since, and now the excess stock is to be handed down to individual enthusiasts. A collection of memorabilia, nearly 200 pedal cars, a Riva speedboat, and several large-scale aircraft will also go under the hammer.

Besides the cars to be offered for auction, Jaguar Land Rover is also planning to loan 40 classics to registered UK charity Starter Motor. These will help encourage a new generation of young enthusiasts learn the skills required for the maintenance, restoration and driving of historic vehicles. Land Rover is continuing this trend by offering apprentices at its plant in Solihull three classic examples of the marque on which to develop their own skills.

Jaguar Land Rover Classic director Tim Hannig said of the Brightwells auction: “We are expanding the range of services we offer to our clients, and the space created by the sale of reserve fleet vehicles will allow us to focus on exciting initiatives. These include Reborn versions of the Range Rover and Jaguar E-Type, Works Legends cars for sale, and the Classic Collection, which are iconic vehicles cared for by a team of specialists at the new Classic Works facility in the UK.”

He continued: “This program of activity also allows Jaguar Land Rover to inspire and train a new generation of classic car enthusiasts, and I am particularly pleased to be supporting the Starter Motor charity through the loan of 40 historic vehicles, including heritage models from Jaguar and Land Rover.”

For an idea of how many cars are already at the Jaguar Land Rover Classic Works HQ, click here.

Matthew Parkin, of Brightwells, added, “These were all bought by someone [James Hull] with great imagination and interest in classic cars, so they’re almost all either low mileage, rare or unusual in some way.”

For the full list of vehicles available visit the Brightwells website.

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WHAT HAPPENED TO THE MOMO MODIFIED LONG NOSE BONNET?

This is a mission.

When former Le Mans works Long Nose D-Types XKD506 and 508, on loan to Briggs Cunningham in the US, were rolled on one weekend, along with Brigg’s own identical D-Type XKD507, the team’s highly credentialed engineer Alfred Momo (who created the Jaguar 3.8 litre engine and ran it for the first time in these cars), decided to change the shape of the fins and add larger cooling vents in the bonnets.

Long story short – ‘506 and ‘508 were returned to the factory, and the cars were scrapped.

As Jaguar began to run out of spares, it sold parts of those two cars to competitors driving D-Types, and that included the bodies, bonnets and rear panels.

XKD502 got the fin and rear end from XKD508 – and also the former entire main body – when it was repaired.

However, the Momo bonnet from 508 was sold to the owner of XKD504, also a former works Long Nose racer.  That seems to have been in 1963 after it had been badly damaged by Lwt E-Type racer Peter Sutcliffe.

Now.  We know the rear fin from XKD508 in Momo form still exists – but the big question is – what happened to the Momo bonnet from XKD504???

Someone must know …

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MYSTERY S.S.1 – 1939 IN SYDNEY

This intriguing image has just appeared and comes from an official open library source.

It is fascinating, and research shows it was taken in the Sydney park at Bronte beach in 1939.

We don’t know who the six young ladies are, or why they are with the S.S.1 Four Light saloon – complete with stylish optional ACE wheel discs and a very bad front type!

We also can’t identify the car as there is no restoration plate or any distinguishing marks.

Remarkably enough, those beach shelters remain and are virtually identical today, but the hill behind is all housing.

Can anyone tell us anything more about this image and its content?

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EDITION #191 IS NOW OUT IN HARD COPY

Our latest edition has now hit the streets in hard copy, and is also on the way to every subscriber’s mail box.

No two editions are alike, of course, and some take more effort to create than others – but this one has taken perhaps the most effort, yet is the most satisfying.

We are very proud to present the ten page feature highlighting Clive Beecham’s ex-works and Ecurie Ecosse Long Nose D-Type XKD603.  It the most original D-Type in existence (in our opinion) finished second at Le Mans in 1957 behind the sister Ecurie Ecosse D-Type – and started in Le Mans four races in a row!  That’s the most of any Jaguar.

Then there is the gorgeous V12 XJ-C belonging to Lance Quartermaine.  It is rare, pristine and was self-restored by an enthusiast in Perth, Western Australia over a three year period.

Jaguar has never built a four cylinder sports car for public sale – until now.  We test drive and live with the four cylinder F-Type Convertible and discover a real surprise package.

Not to forget Alfred Momo – a name your may have heard of in conjunction with Briggs Cunningham.  However, nothing has been documented about him that I have found, and that is a huge shame.  So we spent weeks investigating the Italian/American, his family, his engineering genius, his relationship with Briggs Cunningham – and found he and Briggs even owned and operated the official new car sales business in New York, and also its entire service and spare parts.

These are just teasers too of what is in the entire edition #191.

If you have trouble finding our magazine in your book store, simply subscribe here and it will be in your mail box as soon as the ‘postie’ can deliver it to you – anywhere in the world.

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